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Hobey Doper?


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https://www.usada.org/sanction/dryden-mckay-accepts-doping-sanction/ 

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USADA announced today that Dryden McKay, of Mankato, Minn., an athlete in the sport of hockey, has accepted a six-month period of ineligibility for an anti-doping rule violation.

McKay, 25, tested positive for ostarine (enobosarm) as the result of a sample collected out of competition on January 23, 2022. Ostarine is a Non-Specified Substance in the class of Anabolic Agents and prohibited at all times under the USADA Protocol for Olympic and Paralympic Movement Testing, the United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee National Anti-Doping Policy, and the International Ice Hockey Federation Anti-Doping Regulations, all of which have adopted the World Anti-Doping Code (the Code) and the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List.

 

 

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McKay accepted a six-month period of ineligibility that began on April 14, 2022, the date he accepted this sanction. The athlete was also granted a three-day credit for a provisional suspension served from January 31, 2022 through February 2, 2022. In addition, McKay’s competitive results obtained on January 23, 2022, the date his positive sample was collected, have been disqualified, including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes.

So he played the second half the season under investigation based on Jan 23, 2022 results. 

I seem to recall a CCHA regular season and post-season title, and a couple regional wins and a national semis win. 

 

Hello? NCAA? Hello? 

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7 minutes ago, Sweethockey said:

Are there any possibilities of sanctions or disqualifications of awards given?

Read the Friedman article. The ncaa was aware of this all along, so I doubt it. 

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5 minutes ago, bale31 said:

Read the Friedman article. The ncaa was aware of this all along, so I doubt it. 

The article says: 

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The only people that knew were my parents, my coaches, the trainer and the athletic director,” he said. “I didn’t tell my teammates until (two weeks ago). I didn’t want it out there. If one guy (says), ‘Oh, he tested positive,’ it blows up in my face.”

The article is unclear as to whether the NCAA was told by McKay, MSU-M, or the USADA, and if so, when. 

I'm pretty sure the Hobey Baker committee was unaware until a few hours ago. 

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You're right, it doesn't explicitly state it. I guess my assumption was they did due to this:

 

NCAA rules state “athletes under a drug-testing suspension from a national or international sports governing body” under WADA codes can’t play intercollegiate sports “for the duration of the suspension.” However, he or she “may resume participation if/when a suspension is lifted/completed.”

For the time being, McKay was back on the roster. He didn’t miss a game. He made 45 of 46 saves that weekend as Minnesota State beat Bowling Green 3-1 and 5-0. 

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The MSU-M Compliance Staff could make those things happen (or not happen) before the NCAA is made aware. 

I can not find if USADA or WADA reports positive findings to the NCAA when they test Olympic sport (BB, hockey) athletes. 

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Remember "kids" (and I know you're reading this), as Dryden McKay says:

" ... I, as an athlete, am responsible for what goes into my body." 

That applies to you too. 

If you're not sure, run it past Pooly first. ;) 

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39 minutes ago, SiouxFanSince1990 said:

This is ridiculous. McKay and Mankato needs to pay for this. Take the Hobey back.

I don’t agree. 
Did you read the article? And McKays statement? The 6mo suspension is more than enough punishment IMO. 

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Ostarine is in many over the counter energy supplements. Same substance that earned NDSU's Brock Robbins a one-year football suspension and kept him out of a title game a few years back. He allegedly claimed it was given to him by contracted coach "Pound the Rock" Newman.  Buyer (User) beware. 

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1 hour ago, Brett0909 said:

Assuming Dryden is being honest, and he’s very specific so I’d be shocked if he wasn’t, he took Vitamin D and unknowingly had a negligible amount of a SARM in his system. This has happened to others before, also with independent labs verifying their story. I take Vitamin D, and I’m sure nearly every collegiate athlete takes some supplements. Nobody tests their supplements without cause, who knows what any of us have been subjected to. This is a failing on our systems allowing drug companies to do this. Calling him a “doper”, taking away awards or similar is completely irresponsible discussion imo. If anything, the NCAA and other governing bodies should nullify the suspension based on this evidence. They knowingly have countries doping repeatedly with ACTUAL and intentional PED usage getting caught, with only a slap on the wrist, then take a stance like this?

I’m not excusing anyone who legitimately abused steroid, but we’d be kidding ourselves if we believe the Olympics are PED free. Whether you agree with it or not, PEDs usage is rampant in the Olympics, NHL, and to a lesser extent college. Dryden is likely an unfortunate bystander here of an arbitrary and intentionally poor PED testing protocol (one designed to give illusion of being drug-free, only). Feel bad for the kid getting caught up in this. 

I too feel for the kid. Right, wrong, or indifferent there will be a mark on this year’s Hobie Baker winner…

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3 hours ago, Brett0909 said:

Assuming Dryden is being honest, and he’s very specific so I’d be shocked if he wasn’t, he took Vitamin D and unknowingly had a negligible amount of a SARM in his system. This has happened to others before, also with independent labs verifying their story. I take Vitamin D, and I’m sure nearly every collegiate athlete takes some supplements. Nobody tests their supplements without cause, who knows what any of us have been subjected to. This is a failing on our systems allowing drug companies to do this. Calling him a “doper”, taking away awards or similar is completely irresponsible discussion imo. If anything, the NCAA and other governing bodies should nullify the suspension based on this evidence. They knowingly have countries doping repeatedly with ACTUAL and intentional PED usage getting caught, with only a slap on the wrist, then take a stance like this?

I’m not excusing anyone who legitimately abused steroid, but we’d be kidding ourselves if we believe the Olympics are PED free. Whether you agree with it or not, PEDs usage is rampant in the Olympics, NHL, and to a lesser extent college. Dryden is likely an unfortunate bystander here of an arbitrary and intentionally poor PED testing protocol (one designed to give illusion of being drug-free, only). Feel bad for the kid getting caught up in this. 

He took Quercetin. That isn’t a “natural Vit d supplement”.  It has never once been shown to be beneficial in either treating or preventing Covid. What moron convinced him to take it? It hasn’t been shown to boost anyone’s immune system either. The other outlandish claims including treatment for cancer are also bogus. The supplement industry is a multibillion dollar industry. The makers of these supplements can make virtually any claim they wish regarding their products and they aren’t obligated to prove their supplements work. They also don’t have to list potential side effects. If anyone is dumb enough to believe products that come in a bottle/box/pill form is “natural” then you aren’t very smart. If the Mankato trainers or medical staff knew he was taking this and didn’t tell him to stop they are partly responsible. Most supplements don’t do what the company claims they do and they have potential side effects. These athletes should be getting proper nutrition in their diets. Most don’t need supplemental vitamins and some vitamins in excess can be harmful. Dr. Don Hensrud who I believe grew up in GF, is a Mayo Clinic physician who is a recognized authority on supplements.  He did an excellent presentation on supplements at a Mayo Conference I attended. Most supplements do no more than give you expensive poop. Too many athletic trainers make the mistake of basing recommendations on hearsay they get from colleagues rather than medical evidence. 
I don’t feel sorry for this kid. He made a stupid, decision and these are the consequences. College athletes should think before considering taking supplements and check with their team physicians before taking. 

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If he wanted Vitamin D, why didn’t he take Vitamin D but instead chose this other Quercetin thing as @iramurphysays. Did he go to the store and not know how to spell “D”? 

And all these athletes are told time and again: Don’t take anything that the team hasn’t cleared! 

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