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What do you think of the logo now??

Fighting Hawks logo  

267 members have voted

  1. 1. Now that the dust has settled, what is your grade for the new Fighting Hawks logo now?

    • A
      17
    • B
      64
    • C
      51
    • D
      35
    • F
      100


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15 minutes ago, Frozen4sioux said:

Breaking down a thank you letter and being triggered that it doesn't have certain words you demand to see........

is a truly douchie 2018 cuckfest move... not suprising these days unfourtunetly.

But if the same letter written during the Sioux era would have referenced the team as "Sioux," even casually, then who's douching it up more?  Can't say I know the answer, or the man's writing style, but if the omission here was a conscious effort, that could speak to the author's character.  Protestation by willful blindness or ignoring plain facts seems kind of childish.  Just ask a sportscaster or sports writer how dull their job would be (was) covering a team without a nickname.  As a reader/viewer/fan, "University of North Dakota hockey" certainly grew tiring when it was literally the only way for people to describe things.  Seems kind of silly to write a paragraph or more about the team without referring to its nickname.

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6 hours ago, NoiseInsideMyHead said:

But if the same letter written during the Sioux era would have referenced the team as "Sioux," even casually, then who's douching it up more?  Can't say I know the answer, or the man's writing style, but if the omission here was a conscious effort, that could speak to the author's character.  Protestation by willful blindness or ignoring plain facts seems kind of childish.  Just ask a sportscaster or sports writer how dull their job would be (was) covering a team without a nickname.  As a reader/viewer/fan, "University of North Dakota hockey" certainly grew tiring when it was literally the only way for people to describe things.  Seems kind of silly to write a paragraph or more about the team without referring to its nickname.

Seems silly to look for something in a widely dispersed generic letter so one can bash the head coach of the flagship sports program at the university that you claim to support........but carry on.

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4 hours ago, NoiseInsideMyHead said:

But if the same letter written during the Sioux era would have referenced the team as "Sioux," even casually, then who's douching it up more?  Can't say I know the answer, or the man's writing style, but if the omission here was a conscious effort, that could speak to the author's character.  Protestation by willful blindness or ignoring plain facts seems kind of childish.  Just ask a sportscaster or sports writer how dull their job would be (was) covering a team without a nickname.  As a reader/viewer/fan, "University of North Dakota hockey" certainly grew tiring when it was literally the only way for people to describe things.  Seems kind of silly to write a paragraph or more about the team without referring to its nickname.

Didn't realize that no nickname made covering a team dull for a sportscaster or sportswriter. I always assumed what made it fun was the games and the players themselves.

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49 minutes ago, UNDMOORHEAD said:

Didn't realize that no nickname made covering a team dull for a sportscaster or sportswriter. I always assumed what made it fun was the games and the players themselves.

Let's take a trip to comp class/journalism school.  Below is last week's game story from fightinghawks.com.  Each reference to UND/North Dakota is in bold, each reference to Fighting Hawks is in green.  Each reference to Sam Houston/SHSU is in red, each reference to the Bearkats is in blue.  For a bonus, "home team" is in yellow.

Quote

Wanzek's TD grab, stout defense lead Fighting Hawks to upset victory over No. 5 Sam Houston

UND records first victory over ranked foe since 2016, first on road since 2015

Alec Johnson, FightingHawks.com

 

HUNTSVILLE, Texas -- North Dakota rallied in the final quarter to snap host Sam Houston State's 21-game home winning streak Saturday evening, 24-23, at Bowers Stadium. Noah Wanzek's 8-yard, fourth-down touchdown catch proved to be the difference with 4:44 remaining and the Fighting Hawks defense made it stand up.

 

Sam Houston State (1-1) doesn't lose at home often, in fact, the Bearkats held the FCS' longest home winning streak heading into Saturday's game. The fourth-ranked 'Kats are the highest-ranked team that North Dakota has beaten in its NCAA Division I history.

 

UND's recipe was old school North Dakota football-- run the ball, win the time of possession battle, force field goals instead of touchdowns and no huge plays. North Dakota's balanced attack offensively produced 189 yards in the air and 187 on the ground while the Hawks' defense allowed just four third-down conversions in 13 attempts.

 

North Dakota (2-1) took the opening kickoff 70 yards on 10 plays and chewed up 4:45 to take the early lead. The finishing touch was a 3-yard plunge into the endzone by senior Brady Oliveira, part of a combined 156 first-half rushing yards for the Fighting Hawks.

 

SHSU had an answer on the next drive, going 83 yards over 13 plays before a Kyran Jackson 1-yard run on fourth-and-goal. The UND defense looked poised to turn the Bearkats aside at the goalline during that drive as Jordan Canady made a stop right outside the plain then UND turned aside a handful of attempts deep before the Bearkats were finally able to get in for the score.

 

Austin Cieslak blocked a 49-yard field goal attempt to setup a 60-yard dirve for the Hawks in the second quarter. Brady Leach's boot from 26 was good and North Dakota reclaimed the advantage. After a quick three-and-out, UND again marched methodically down the field, rushing nine times and sprinkling in a pair of pass completions to take a 10-point lead. James Johannesson barreled his way down to the nine then bullied down to the one where Nate Ketteringham finished the job from a yard out for North Dakota's largest lead of the night.

 

SHSU was able to tack on a field goal before the half to make it 17-10 at the break. UND out-gained the Bearkats, 240-158 and controlled the time of possession battle, owning the ball for more than 18-and-a-half minutes.

 

In the third, the home team posted 13 points to jump out to a 23-17 advantage. Two of those scoring drives, though, could have easily been worse if not for big stops to force field goal attempts. With the score tied, 17-apiece, SHSU got a blocked field goal deep in UND territory, taking over at the 4-yardline but couldn't punch it in. The Bearkats settled for a 34-yard field goal then got another field goal after getting down to the UND 6 but failing to get in the endzone.

 

Those would prove costly for SHSU, who has qualified for the NCAA playoffs in each of the past seven seasons, including five appearances in the semifinals or later. With little over nine minutes remaining, UND set out on a 12-play, 84-yard game-winning drive.

 

Sophomore Izzy Adeoti had a huge 48-yard catch to flip the field position early in that possession. Ketteringham then found Wanzek on 4th-and-3 for a 4-yard gain. After Ketteringham rushed for eight yards to setup 1st-and-goal, SHSU was forced to burn a pair of timeouts on the third and fourth down plays. Wanzek sprung free in the corner of the endzone where Ketteringham fired a strike that Wanzek dove to snare while keeping his body inbounds. Brady Leach tacked on the extra-point and the upset was brewing at full boil.

 

The UND defense got a quick turnover on downs stopping a 4th-and-2 to just a one-yard gain and UND needed only to run out the clock. James Johannesson did the honors, rushing three times to get the first down and then Brady Oliveira had the final two carries before the victory formation signaled UND's biggest win since joining the FCS.

 

North Dakota had four players rush for over 40 yards with Santiago carrying 13 times for 58 yards. Oliveira added 53 yards and a score while Johanneson toted it nine times for 45 yards and a touchdown with Ketteringham pitching in 43 yards on seven carries.

 

Ketteringham completed 16-of-29 for 189 yards and the winning score, stretching his streak of attempts without an interception to 89 consecutive (three games).

 

Noah Larson led all UND tacklers with nine total tackles. Evan Holm registered four pass breakups, including several key ones in the final stages of the game.

 

North Dakota returns home to host Idaho State in the annual homecoming game and the 53rd Potato Bowl. Kick is set for 4:00 p.m.

 

NOTES:

*UND snaps the nation's longest home winning streak at 21 games, handing the Bearkats their first loss at home since Sept. 19, 2015 to Lamar.

*The Fighting Hawks also captured their first triumph against a ranked foe since Oct. 1, 2016 vs. Cal Poly and the first away from Grand Forks since Oct. 3, 2015 at Portland State.

*The No. 5 ranking is the highest-rated opponent that North Dakota has defeated in the DI era (2008-present).

*Izzy Adeoti finished the night with 82 yards receiving, a career high.

*Santiago recorded 158 all-purpose yards to push him over 6,000 for his distinguished career.

Copyright ©2018 North Dakota Athletics

Can you imagine that article without the familiar rhythm and the comfortable flow afforded by alternating labels for the teams?  Sports journalism flourishes with nicknames; take them away and the writing is stilted and, yes, quite dull.

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1 hour ago, NoiseInsideMyHead said:

Let's take a trip to comp class/journalism school.  Below is last week's game story from fightinghawks.com.  Each reference to UND/North Dakota is in bold, each reference to Fighting Hawks is in green.  Each reference to Sam Houston/SHSU is in red, each reference to the Bearkats is in blue.  For a bonus, "home team" is in yellow.

Can you imagine that article without the familiar rhythm and the comfortable flow afforded by alternating labels for the teams?  Sports journalism flourishes with nicknames; take them away and the writing is stilted and, yes, quite dull.

It honestly doesn't matter to me personally. Every time I read Hawks, Fighting Hawks, UND, North Dakota, and even Sioux or Fighting Sioux I think of the same school and teams.

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6 hours ago, WiSioux said:

Get a life.

Predictable response on a message board that caters, in part, to neanderthal sports fans.  I see I struck a nerve with my logical, evidence-based, and coherent analysis of the written word.  You were so dumbstruck that you could only muster a half-baked insult. 

You have a great weekend!  Your belief that your life is somehow more complete, robust, and fulfilling than mine is surely more than enough to get you by.

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6 hours ago, UNDMOORHEAD said:

It honestly doesn't matter to me personally. Every time I read Hawks, Fighting Hawks, UND, North Dakota, and even Sioux or Fighting Sioux I think of the same school and teams.

But that's kind of the point, right?  Because ALL of those words - that colorful rainbow of verbiage - in fact refer to the SAME team.  It's the writer's ability to use the entire palate that makes communication fun, and interesting, and for the most part readable.  Pay attention to the next several sportscasts and game articles you come across, and I think you will see the interplay, and value, of interchangeable labels for the teams.

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2 hours ago, NoiseInsideMyHead said:

But that's kind of the point, right?  Because ALL of those words - that colorful rainbow of verbiage - in fact refer to the SAME team.  It's the writer's ability to use the entire palate that makes communication fun, and interesting, and for the most part readable.  Pay attention to the next several sportscasts and game articles you come across, and I think you will see the interplay, and value, of interchangeable labels for the teams.

^^^^^^He/She's right, you know

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10 hours ago, NoiseInsideMyHead said:

Let's take a trip to comp class/journalism school.  Below is last week's game story from fightinghawks.com.  Each reference to UND/North Dakota is in bold, each reference to Fighting Hawks is in green.  Each reference to Sam Houston/SHSU is in red, each reference to the Bearkats is in blue.  For a bonus, "home team" is in yellow.

Can you imagine that article without the familiar rhythm and the comfortable flow afforded by alternating labels for the teams?  Sports journalism flourishes with nicknames; take them away and the writing is stilted and, yes, quite dull.

Sports journalism to the masses is quite different than someone, i.e. a head coach,  penning a thank you letter to a select few.  Thought even you with your vast knowledge of the written word could understand that. Not disagreeing with your general thought process but you are comparing apples to oranges.

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The one thing that we all have is UND Pride.  And that goes for its athletic teams as well.  Sioux Pride was something we all had.  We wore the logo, we chanted the name.  Sioux Pride was more than just a nickname for our athletic teams.  It was a tribute to the Sioux Nation that still reside in the great state of North Dakota.  It stood for something more than just a name to call our teams.

When you go from a name as rich in pride and heritage as the Sioux to a name that is generic like the Hawks, it goes without saying that you lose that sense of pride.  The same sense of pride and honor just isn''t there with the Hawks name.  And that is to be understood.  And is exactly why the Fighting Hawks name isn't being overwhelmingly embraced.  There wasn't going to be a name that UND fans were going to embrace and have that sense of pride for as much as they did for the Fighting Sioux name.  And that is OK. 

Those that have embraced the Fighting Hawks name aren't trying to tell others that aren't that the Fighting Hawks name is better than the Fighting Sioux name and that you must forget the past, throw all your Sioux merchandise away and fully accept the new name and logo.  There is a part of every UND fan that will always have that Sioux pride is us.  But that doesn't go away when you cheer for and embrace the Fighting Hawks name.  Whether its Flickertails, Sioux, or Hawks, it has always been the University of North Dakota.  

 

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12 hours ago, sprig said:

No one here is complaining about writers use of hawks, fhawks, or UND in sports articles.  Yet someone here finds nickname conspiracy in a coach's thank you letter to season ticket holders.  Trying to continue the concept of a divide between rea, hockey, etc and other und sports. The divide is disappearing,  yet anti hockey/rea individuals choose to  try and make it continue

I know I can send you a card later this year wishing you a "Merry Christmas".  Others here ..........not so much. 

#curledupinthefetalposition

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22 hours ago, FGHTNSX Hawkey14 said:

Sure puts the primary logo in perspective.... Yikes!

Exactly.  for those that were upset about the logo, we could have ended up with something like this.  Given the alternative, I am glad SME went with an original looking logo instead of the same bird head logo like this one.  

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On 9/22/2018 at 3:49 PM, Cratter said:

UND officially has a new logo.

 

20180922_154104.jpg

 

Looks a little like this guy....Foghorn Leghorn's buddy, Henry Hawk.

th?id=OIP.iOqKSlcgKD3jBsLRpy8zywHaF7&pid=15.1&P=0&w=224&h=180

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32 minutes ago, Blackheart said:

 

Looks a little like this guy....Foghorn Leghorn's buddy, Henry Hawk.

th?id=OIP.iOqKSlcgKD3jBsLRpy8zywHaF7&pid=15.1&P=0&w=224&h=180

You probably just named the mascot.

Henry the Fighting Hawk.

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