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The Sicatoka

Online Students?

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I was doing some reading recently regarding online students in the North Dakota University System. Some folks like to spin online enrollments so I wanted to see for myself. 

 

Most of the numbers below are from Table 6 of this:

http://www.ndus.edu/uploads/reports/131/2014-fall-enrollment-report.pdf

 

Total enrollment numbers came from Table 1. 

 

First thing to see: 

 

Yes, UND has many "online only/not on campus" students. I suspect many of those are teachers and nurses working on masters degrees. And UND has an *accredited* distance engineering program to achieve a bachelor's degree. Those are huge items for people in a remote state looking to advance professionally. Table 13 probably speaks a little bit to this. UND has 4,506 students age 25 and older. NDSU has 2,928 students that are 25 and older. Part of this can obviously be attributed to UND's law and med schools but not all of it by any means.  On top of that, when you look at FTE's UND definitely has more part-time students (4,120 vs 2,830 in headcount) which would also speak to people working (slowly) toward a degree. 

 

But now digging into Table 6: 

 

UND: 
  • 35.5% (5,289 out of 14,906) of total enrollment take at least one online class.
  • 14.2% (2,116 out of 14,906) of the total enrollment is considered on campus but takes at least one online class.  Translated, 18.0% (2,116 out of 11,733) "on-campus" students take at least some form of online classes.
  • 64.5% (9,617 out of 14,906) are truly "campus only students"

 

NDSU: 

 

  • 40.2% (5,928 out of 14,747) of total enrollment take at least one online class.
  • 33.2% (4,889 out of 14,474) of the total enrollment is considered on campus but takes at least one online class.  Translated, 35.7% (4,889 out of 13,708) "on-campus" students take at least some form of online classes.
  • 59.8% (8,819 out of 14,747) are truly "campus only students"

Contrary to the myth in some quarters, UND has a larger fraction of its students who are "campus only students" and thus a smaller fraction taking at least one online class. 

 

The question now becomes how many online hours are those "on campus" students taking?  You only need to show up on campus once to be considered having an "on campus" presence (NDSU 33.2, UND 14.2). Is it one lab that they have to show up for in person and the rest is online or is it just one online class and they are attending on campus classes the rest of the time?  

 

The source really doesn't add clarity on that subject. Its a matter of how many online classes the rest of those categorized as "on-campus but takes at least one online class" are actually taking.

 

Even with what is there, the points still stand: 

  • True "campus only students" at UND is 64.5% and is 59.8% at NDSU.  
  • A larger fraction of NDSU students (40.2 vs 35.5) take at least one online class <-- that busts the myth about UND being "online students" as a prime source of the myth has a larger fraction
  • NDSU's 5928 taking at least one online class is larger than UND's 5289
  • Upvote 3

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I was doing some reading recently regarding online students in the North Dakota University System. Some folks like to spin online enrollments so I wanted to see for myself. 

 

Most of the numbers below are from Table 6 of this:

http://www.ndus.edu/uploads/reports/131/2014-fall-enrollment-report.pdf

 

Total enrollment numbers came from Table 1. 

 

First thing to see: 

 

Yes, UND has many "online only/not on campus" students. I suspect many of those are teachers and nurses working on masters degrees. And UND has an *accredited* distance engineering program to achieve a bachelor's degree. Those are huge items for people in a remote state looking to advance professionally. Table 13 probably speaks a little bit to this. UND has 4,506 students age 25 and older. NDSU has 2,928 students that are 25 and older. Part of this can obviously be attributed to UND's law and med schools but not all of it by any means.  On top of that, when you look at FTE's UND definitely has more part-time students (4,120 vs 2,830 in headcount) which would also speak to people working (slowly) toward a degree. 

 

But now digging into Table 6: 

 

UND: 

  • 35.5% (5,289 out of 14,906) of total enrollment take at least one online class.
  • 14.2% (2,116 out of 14,906) of the total enrollment is considered on campus but takes at least one online class.  Translated, 18.0% (2,116 out of 11,733) "on-campus" students take at least some form of online classes.
  • 64.5% (9,617 out of 14,906) are truly "campus only students"
 

NDSU: 

 

  • 40.2% (5,928 out of 14,747) of total enrollment take at least one online class.
  • 33.2% (4,889 out of 14,474) of the total enrollment is considered on campus but takes at least one online class.  Translated, 35.7% (4,889 out of 13,708) "on-campus" students take at least some form of online classes.
  • 59.8% (8,819 out of 14,747) are truly "campus only students"
Contrary to the myth in some quarters, UND has a larger fraction of its students who are "campus only students" and thus a smaller fraction taking at least one online class. 

 

The question now becomes how many online hours are those "on campus" students taking?  You only need to show up on campus once to be considered having an "on campus" presence (NDSU 33.2, UND 14.2). Is it one lab that they have to show up for in person and the rest is online or is it just one online class and they are attending on campus classes the rest of the time?  

 

The source really doesn't add clarity on that subject. Its a matter of how many online classes the rest of those categorized as "on-campus but takes at least one online class" are actually taking.

 

Even with what is there, the points still stand: 

  • True "campus only students" at UND is 64.5% and is 59.8% at NDSU.  
  • A larger fraction of NDSU students (40.2 vs 35.5) take at least one online class <-- that busts the myth about UND being "online students" as a prime source of the myth has a larger fraction
  • NDSU's 5928 taking at least one online class is larger than UND's 5289

Bisonville will have to eat barbecued crow, as this will turn it on its head. All the snide comments about UND being mostly online, applies more to them than to us. Wow.

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I would love to hear Tony's response to this because he is all about enrollment, actual bodies on campus, and lying about the numbers.  He actually gets very psychotic when talking about it.   :crazy:

  • Upvote 2

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I know for a fact that a decent amount of teachers from all over the world take online classes through UND to get their Masters.  I am sure they make up a portion of the older group that only takes online classes and lives off campus. 

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Onlone learning is very self directed. IMHO...better for upper level and grad students. But...depends on the learner and the type of course.

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Online classes are a joke regardless of where you take them.

That is all

 

Uh, no they ALL aren't a joke.  Some were, others were pretty hard and involved a ton of work (education).

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Disclosure statement: Another poster helped me sift through and interpret/understand some of the nuances in the numbers. I'll leave it to them to self-disclose if they so choose. 

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As Sicatoka stated, the rub is that there is no breakdown of the students that take classes online and on campus.  A single credit on campus lab gets you thrown into the category as does a one-credit online intro-to-something class, with both being very different in terms of presence on campus.

 

Without that, it is still very interesting that UND has a larger number and percentage of students who are strictly "on-campus".

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Online classes are a joke regardless of where you take them.

That is all

Online anything for Tony and you is a joke. You've already proven that.

Some people have actual talents and maturity to work independently and they have actual full-time jobs and families to support.

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As Sicatoka stated, the rub is there is no breakdown of the students that take classes online and on campus.  A single credit on campus lab gets you thrown into the category as does a one-credit online intro-to-something class, with both being very different in terms of presence on campus.

 

Without that, it is still very interesting that UND has a larger number and percentage of students who are strictly "on-campus".

 

To jdub's point, two full-time students:

 

Student A:

14 credits of online coursework

1 credit mandatory on-campus lab

 

Student B: 

14 credits on-campus

1 credit general ed req's class to fit schedule 

 

 

Both under the NDUS way of reporting the numbers are considered "on campus but takes at least one online class".

 

I'd rather see the credit hours breakdowns (per category of student). 

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Disclosure statement: Another poster helped me sift through and interpret/understand some of the nuances in the numbers. I'll leave it to them to self-disclose if they so choose. 

 

 

My check book didn't balance for April so safe to say it wasn't me..............

 

IMO a vast majority of one's college education should require a butt in a seat among other butts in seats.

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My check book didn't balance for April so safe to say it wasn't me..............

 

IMO a vast majority of one's college education should require a butt in a seat among other butts in seats.

 

Which would be their undergrad or an immediate graduate degree following it.  Once they are employed it is rather hard to get their butt in a seat 3 times a week.  

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Online anything for Tony and you is a joke. You've already proven that.

Some people have actual talents and maturity to work independently and they have actual full-time jobs and families to support.

You probably haven't seen how online classes work then.

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You probably haven't seen how online classes work then.

 

Your education clearly didn't work if you think all online classes are the same.

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You probably haven't seen how online classes work then.

 

You must be speaking from your collegiate experiences. 

 

There's a little more to it when it comes to UND's ABET accredited online engineering degrees (chemical, civil, electrical, mechanical, petroleum). 

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Damn you Sic, how could you throw facts at the FU faithful....they don't like that. Don't you know the only facts are the crap they post on Bisonswille.

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My check book didn't balance for April so safe to say it wasn't me..............

 

IMO a vast majority of one's college education should require a butt in a seat among other butts in seats.

There is "School" and there is "College". I went to UND for both.

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There is "School" and there is "College". I went to UND for both.

Me too......sitting behind a screen in your dorm or apartment for everything you do won't get you both.

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Disclosure statement: Another poster helped me sift through and interpret/understand some of the nuances in the numbers.

Really? I didn't know that you and gfhockey were besties!

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You education clearly didn't work if you think all online classes are the same.

Unless they are having you as an individual take a proctored exam I'm going to be skeptical. Way too easy to cheat otherwise.

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You education clearly didn't work...

I know that was a sticky "r" on you iPhone but it still made me laugh out loud.

  • Upvote 1

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Unless they are having you as an individual take a proctored exam I'm going to be skeptical. Way too easy to cheat otherwise.

So then it would up to the quality of the person, as to whether or not they got their education.

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On May 11, 2015 at 11:10 AM, The Sicatoka said:

I was doing some reading recently regarding online students in the North Dakota University System. Some folks like to spin online enrollments so I wanted to see for myself. 

 

Most of the numbers below are from Table 6 of this:

http://www.ndus.edu/uploads/reports/131/2014-fall-enrollment-report.pdf

 

Total enrollment numbers came from Table 1. 

 

First thing to see: 

 

Yes, UND has many "online only/not on campus" students. I suspect many of those are teachers and nurses working on masters degrees. And UND has an *accredited* distance engineering program to achieve a bachelor's degree. Those are huge items for people in a remote state looking to advance professionally. Table 13 probably speaks a little bit to this. UND has 4,506 students age 25 and older. NDSU has 2,928 students that are 25 and older. Part of this can obviously be attributed to UND's law and med schools but not all of it by any means.  On top of that, when you look at FTE's UND definitely has more part-time students (4,120 vs 2,830 in headcount) which would also speak to people working (slowly) toward a degree. 

 

But now digging into Table 6: 

 

UND: 
  • 35.5% (5,289 out of 14,906) of total enrollment take at least one online class.
  • 14.2% (2,116 out of 14,906) of the total enrollment is considered on campus but takes at least one online class.  Translated, 18.0% (2,116 out of 11,733) "on-campus" students take at least some form of online classes.
  • 64.5% (9,617 out of 14,906) are truly "campus only students"

 

NDSU: 

 

  • 40.2% (5,928 out of 14,747) of total enrollment take at least one online class.
  • 33.2% (4,889 out of 14,474) of the total enrollment is considered on campus but takes at least one online class.  Translated, 35.7% (4,889 out of 13,708) "on-campus" students take at least some form of online classes.
  • 59.8% (8,819 out of 14,747) are truly "campus only students"

Contrary to the myth in some quarters, UND has a larger fraction of its students who are "campus only students" and thus a smaller fraction taking at least one online class. 

 

The question now becomes how many online hours are those "on campus" students taking?  You only need to show up on campus once to be considered having an "on campus" presence (NDSU 33.2, UND 14.2). Is it one lab that they have to show up for in person and the rest is online or is it just one online class and they are attending on campus classes the rest of the time?  

 

The source really doesn't add clarity on that subject. Its a matter of how many online classes the rest of those categorized as "on-campus but takes at least one online class" are actually taking.

 

Even with what is there, the points still stand: 

  • True "campus only students" at UND is 64.5% and is 59.8% at NDSU.  
  • A larger fraction of NDSU students (40.2 vs 35.5) take at least one online class <-- that busts the myth about UND being "online students" as a prime source of the myth has a larger fraction
  • NDSU's 5928 taking at least one online class is larger than UND's 5289

Nice breakdown. What are the numbers now in 2018. 

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42 minutes ago, moser53 said:

Nice breakdown. What are the numbers now in 2018. 

Well Alex Jones, I’m sure you could look it up. 

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