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WSJ: Oil Booms in North Dakota

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This thread is about oil. Start a new one about healthcare if you want to talk about that.

It is and once again you haven't put forth any valid points...just polyanna speculation.

And since when did a Bison tool like yourself become a moderator as what can be posted in a thread? :lol:

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Just read over the noon hour, Obama wants more offshore drilling. Says it will create jobs and enhance nation's security.

How old are you, MplsBison??? "Give it 20 years."

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Just read over the noon hour, Obama wants more offshore drilling. Says it will create jobs and enhance nation's security.

How old are you, MplsBison??? "Give it 20 years."

There are many more uses for oil than to be refined into 87 octane gasoline for passenger vehicles.

The comment 'give it 20 years' refers to passenger vehicles running purely on electric means. Just today I read that FedEx has 4 totally EV delivery trucks running now in California. The internal combustion engine had its day, it's time to move on to better things.

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There are many more uses for oil than to be refined into 87 octane gasoline for passenger vehicles.

The comment 'give it 20 years' refers to passenger vehicles running purely on electric means. Just today I read that FedEx has 4 totally EV delivery trucks running now in California. The internal combustion engine had its day, it's time to move on to better things.

What is better than the internal combustion engine and why is it better?

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Just read over the noon hour, Obama wants more offshore drilling. Says it will create jobs and enhance nation's security.

How old are you, MplsBison??? "Give it 20 years."

Don't get too excited. If you're familiar with the movie Army of Darkness, the appropriate quote is "it's a trick, get an axe." It's a typically two-faced scheme to garner support for cap and trade, promise next to nothing, then renege. Just like nuclear energy, it will be tied up with endless litigation and red tape by certain interests. Remember ten years ago when the reason not to drill was that it would take ten years to come on-line, think about that next time you're tanking up, and then again next time you're voting.

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There are many more uses for oil than to be refined into 87 octane gasoline for passenger vehicles.

The comment 'give it 20 years' refers to passenger vehicles running purely on electric means. Just today I read that FedEx has 4 totally EV delivery trucks running now in California. The internal combustion engine had its day, it's time to move on to better things.

Bison Boy, You are finally right about something! There are more uses for oil. For example, your inflatable girl/boyfriend is undoubtedly made out of a petroleum based substance. So if there is less oil being produced, you will have a tougher time replacing her/him the next time you leave" it" too close to a fire or sharp object, resulting in a catastrophic loss of air... And the replacement cost will surely be significantly higher as well.

Now, on to your next point, that being Fedex. The last time you ordered one of your inflatable "friends", there is a good chance that it was delivered by Fedex, because you absolutely, positively, had to have it overnight. :lol: Being that you supposedly live in Minneapolis, there is no way "it" was delivered by one of their 4 electric trucks in California. So how did that make you feel, knowing that your selfish need and desire for companionship and intimacy contributed to pollution (and probably global warming, in your eyes)?

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Bison Boy, You are finally right about something! There are more uses for oil. For example, your inflatable girl/boyfriend is undoubtedly made out of a petroleum based substance. So if there is less oil being produced, you will have a tougher time replacing her/him the next time you leave" it" too close to a fire or sharp object, resulting in a catastrophic loss of air... And the replacement cost will surely be significantly higher as well.

Now, on to your next point, that being Fedex. The last time you ordered one of your inflatable "friends", there is a good chance that it was delivered by Fedex, because you absolutely, positively, had to have it overnight. :lol: Being that you supposedly live in Minneapolis, there is no way "it" was delivered by one of their 4 electric trucks in California. So how did that make you feel, knowing that your selfish need and desire for companionship and intimacy contributed to pollution (and probably global warming, in your eyes)?

Jesus, with the repeated beat down you give this clown its amazing he doesn't quit...Sheez, just give it 20 years!

BobIwabuchiFan

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What is better than the internal combustion engine and why is it better?

He really can't answer this because his grand statements are limited to situations where the significant difference between spark ignition engines and electric motors is minimalized by his arguements. Again, the main purpose of the Volt is to meet the urban travel needs of the city dweller in stable temperature environments. Studies show that if they can get 40 miles on a charge it would fit the needs of urban/city car users for a very large percentage of their travel needs. Basically if you don't live in a big city and don't want to be like our bison troll then you are an abomination and should have your license taken away. Note that spark ignition engines are capable of meeting the driving needs of a larger portion of the population and the varied driving environments and needs of the customer. Hence, electric motor will most likely never meet the full range of capability and use of the spark ignition engine even in the next 20 years.

BobIwabuchiFan

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Jesus, with the repeated beat down you give this clown its amazing he doesn't quit...Sheez, just give it 20 years!

BobIwabuchiFan

I've only had about 40 posts total in nearly 8 years here, until Bison Boy made his illustrious debut. Thanks to him, I have tripled that in no time. :lol:

Yesterday was the first time I looked at this thread. When I saw Bison Boy's verbal banquet was on display here too, I decided to read the whole thing. At least he's consistent... His posts on this thread are just as assinine as they are on the other threads. I am just thankful that his views are the complete opposite of mine on everything, not just the nickname issue. Wonder if he's also a rodent fan by chance? Hhmmmm

And I kind of feel sympathy for some of the Bison fans, as it must really suck having a joker like this using your favorite team's nickname in his monicker...

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Studies show that if they can get 40 miles on a charge it would fit the needs of urban/city car users for a very large percentage of their travel needs.

BobIwabuchiFan

I know we don't like Bison Boys but lets not that cloud our judgement.

I am not saying the world is going to change any time soon but,

Electric cars have been around a long time. Way before the Volt. And what has killed them? Its not just that technology hasn't been there. Its about money and politics as we know and the oil industry has a lot of it to throw around to protect their product.

Hence, electric motor will most likely never meet the full range of capability and use of the spark ignition engine even in the next 20 years.

To says this is pretty preposterous. Right now there is an all electric car on the road in the USA that goes more than 200+ miles per charge which is equivalent to 120 miles per gallon.

Oh yeah and did I mention it goes from zero to 60 mph in 3.7 seconds faster than Porsches and Ferraris! :lol:

*I understand there is limitations.

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What is better than the internal combustion engine and why is it better?

Energy efficiency of internal combustion: http://courses.washington.edu/me341/oct22v2.htm

Very poor compared to electric motors.

The problem always has been and always will be, how do you carry enough energy with you to power your electric motor? Batteries are heavy, gasoline is comparatively light.

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I know we don't like Bison Boys but lets not that cloud our judgement.

I am not saying the world is going to change any time soon but,

Electric cars have been around a long time. Way before the Volt. And what has killed them? Its not just that technology hasn't been there. Its about money and politics as we know and the oil industry has a lot of it to throw around to protect their product.

To says this is pretty preposterous. Right now there is an all electric car on the road in the USA that goes more than 200+ miles per charge which is equivalent to 120 miles per gallon.

Oh yeah and did I mention it goes from zero to 60 mph in 3.7 seconds faster than Porsches and Ferraris! :lol:

*I understand there is limitations.

Do you really think that a truly better option could be suppressed, by anyone, let alone the nefarious oil industry? If there were an alternative to internal combustion, a real alternative that doesn't need to be propped up with MASSIVE government subsidies or equally MASSIVE punitive taxes, that is. How would you even do such a thing? It's less about money and politics and more about the fact that they aren't economically viable, and oh yeah, people don't want them. Why would a company produce something nobody wants to buy?

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Do you really think that a truly better option could be suppressed, by anyone, let alone the nefarious oil industry? If there were an alternative to internal combustion how would you even do such a thing?

It's just one of many reasons. Not the main reason. I was just pointing out the facts. Lobbyists run the world. You should know that. Not just oil ones. But I'll explain one for you:

In California, where smog is a major problem, electric cars started catching on. Cities even started to build "Charging Stations." (Does that show their was a demand?) But the oil industry funded consumer organizations to stop them. The oil industry also paid for editorials in national publications (Time, Newsweek, etc) essentially trying to sway public opinion (including factually inaccurate ones: Environmental benefits of electric cars are dubious).

Companies want to protect their profits; its only natural. Or as I simply stated previously to generate this long post:

Its about money and politics as we know and the oil industry has a lot of it to throw around to protect their product.

A company isn't going to start to make and sell (or try and educate and advertise) less profitable Electric Vehicles (they want to sell trucks - GM bought Hummer) unless it has too. And if no car company is really making any electric vehicle. No worries. GM, Honda, etc told people to return their electric cars they had leased and destroyed them some ten years ago.

I'll spare you the history of how Hybrids started take hold on the marketplace (How that "demand" was created).

Why would a company produce something nobody wants to buy?

If nobody wants to buy them why is there a rush to make electric vehicles all of a sudden (by Ford and GM) again?

They aren't economically viable, and oh yeah, people don't want them.

Where are you getting this stuff? Aren't economically viable? I see all electric cars being driven in Grand Forks.

I'm still waiting for Hydrogen. :lol:

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ive said this before, but i will repeat it for you mplsbison, don't use wikipedia as your main source for an argument, it lessens any point you are trying to make, legitimate or not. wikipedia is an internet application than anyone can add information to at anytime. it is not verified (at least not in real time), that is not what it is meant for. the particular information you posted may be true, i don't know, i didn't read it, that is not the point... dr. phil may know some accurate information about the human heart, but i'm not letting him perform triple bypass on me, he's not really a doctor... and wikipedia isn't really an accurate, verified information source.

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This article ties into the original thread subject.

NY Times

What's amazing is that most of the major players in Bakken will be significantly increasing their drilling activity over the next year. Continental, Conoco, EOG, XTO, Whiting, Hess, Marathon, and Brigham are all significantly increasing their capital budgets for Bakken development. With the changing and improving economics of Bakken, this wave could extend for another decade.

Harold Ham of Continental Oil

Brigham Oil's major Bakken expansion

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Another Oil Boom in ND: Bottineau County and the Spearfish Formation

Central Bottineau County is poised to become the hub of a brand new boom.

Oil wells are not new to Bottineau County. 40 years ago, several successful wells were drilled there. But the work going on this summer on drilling rigs like this could signal the beginning of a major oil rush to the region. ...

Bottineau County could see as many as seven thousand new oil wells drilled over the next decade. That would be an oil boom on the scale of the Bakken boom that has hit Mountrail County in the past few years.

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An interesting perspective from an English-language Persian Gulf newspaper:

Abu Dhabi: The Bakken oil rush could rock OPEC

Costs for producing oil from the relatively shallow wells required to tap Bakken oil pools have fallen to about $5 per barrel, compared with tens of dollars per barrel for extracting tar-like bitumen from Canada’s oil sands and chemically converting it into synthetic light crude.

The horizontal drilling and fracturing techniques that Halliburton pioneered to unlock the mid-continent oil treasure are the same technologies that in 2007 spurred a US gas-drilling boom. The effects of that have rippled around the world, weighing not only on North American gas prices but also on international markets for the liquefied natural gas now shipped across oceans from states such as Qatar.

OPEC producers would do well to remember that; the next threat to oil price stability may come not from market speculation or renewable energy but from a new North American oil rush.

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Thanks in no small part to the oil boom, North Dakota still has the lowest unemployment rate in the country: http://finance.yahoo.com/tech-ticker/10-states-with-ridiculously-low-unemployment----and-why-535377.html?tickers=^dji,^gspc,spy,dia,udn,edv,uup

1. North Dakota: Powered by agriculture and commodities

Unemployment Rate: 3.6%

Lower Than America's Unemployment Rate By: 5.9%

Major Industries Driving The State's Economy: Agriculture, petroleum, food processing, and tourism dominate the nation's most job-friendly state.

Education: 25.7% of the adult population has a Bachelor's degree or higher. (Lower than average)

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When the newspaper in the epicenter of the US oil industry is editorializing about the Bakken and imploring the President to act, the significance can not be understated:

Houston Chronicle Editorial: The Bakken Factor could be US bridge to renewable energy future

Eleven billion barrels is the latest estimate of reserves in the state's share of the Bakken Formation, which extends for some 25,000 square miles from Canada down into Montana, Wyoming and the Dakotas. Increasingly, the Bakken is being viewed as a major oil resource in the United States.

...

We believe this: The news about the enhanced estimates of reserves in North Dakota, coupled with the development of potentially enormous natural gas plays in Texas, Louisiana, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and New York state, should be the driver for a revamped national energy policy that relies more heavily on these resources to build a bridge into a future based on renewable energy. This country does not need to be held hostage to oil coming from politically unstable areas. Increasingly, it seems, we have a choice. Let's find out more.

President Obama has an opportunity to make this case - and we encourage him to do so in his State of the Union address, set for early February.

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North Dakota's Big Boom

According to published analyses, state tax revenues from oil extraction could total an additional $2 billion through mid-2013. And depending on where rising oil prices eventually go as the global economy continues to recover, the amount could be even higher.

"There have been booms and busts in the past in North Dakota," Mark Jendrysik, chair of the department of political science and public administration at the University of North Dakota, told FOX Business. "But this time people think it's going to be different, especially with the newer technologies."

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